Cycle 2

grade 3

SWLSB

Cycle 2

Grade 3

Material World

Matter

WHAT'S THE MATTER?

Essential Question:

How can we classify and understand the objects around us?

WHAT DOES THE STUDENT NEED TO KNOW?(POL)

HOW WILL IT BE TAUGHT?

1. Properties and characteristics of matter

e. Describes the shape, colour and texture of an object or a substance

f. Distinguishes between the mass (quantity of matter) of an object and its weight (gravitational force acting on the mass)

g. Classifies solids according to their density (identical volumes and different masses or identical masses and different volumes)

h. Associates buoyancy of a volume of liquid in an identical volume of a different liquid with the densities of these liquids (relative density)

5. Changes in matter

a. Demonstrates that physical changes (e.g. deforming, breaking, grinding, phase changes) do not change the properties of matter

c. Explains how certain household products are made (e.g. soap, paper)


Suggested approach;

  • Students explore the concept everything is made of matter and that matter exists in 3 states; solid, liquid, or gas,
  • Explore the concept that solids and liquids have their own characteristics,
  • Explore the idea that solids, liquids, and gasses can change shape,
  • Give students a group of varied objects and ask them to sort them into categories of groups
  • ask the students how they distinguished/sorted the objects as a way of introducing the to develop the idea of a CHARACTERISTIC or a PROPERTY
  • Now revisit the same objects and categorise them by SHAPE, COLOUR and TEXTURE

Experiment/Inquiry opportunities:


ed-tech resources:

SWLSB

Cycle 2

Grade 3

Material World

Energy

GETTING ENERGIZED!

Essential Question:

What types of ‘energy’ exist and how do humans use them?

WHAT DOES THE STUDENT NEED TO KNOW?(POL)

HOW WILL IT BE TAUGHT?

1. Forms of energy

a. Describes different forms of energy (mechanical, electrical, light, chemical, heat, sound, nuclear)

b. Identifies sources of energy in his/her environment (e.g. moving water, chemical reaction in a battery, sunlight)

2. Transmission of energy

e. Identifies the characteristics of a sound wave (e.g. volume, timbre, echo)

g. Explains the motion of convection in liquids and gases (e.g. boiling water)

3. Transformation of energy

a. Describes situations in which human beings consume energy (e.g. heating, transportation, food consumption, recreation)

b. Names means used by human beings to limit their energy consumption (e.g. fluorescent light bulbs, timers) and to conserve energy (e.g. insulation

d. Describes the transformations of energy from one form to another

Suggested approach

  • Class discussion about aspects of energy (what energy is, energy types vs energy source)
  • Explore the concept that energy transforms from one form to another, that it can be converted,
  • Explore the idea that the wind, the sun, and water can be used to "create" energy,
  • Brainstorm situations in which human beings use energy (e.g. heating, transportation, food consumption, recreation)
  • Brainstorms ways to reduce energy consumption

Experiment/Inquiry opportunities::

  • set up an ‘energy circus’; stations around the class in which student identify the type of energy transformations taking place e.g. flashlight, green plant, stereo etc.

Other experiments/demos:

Energy video (Bill Nye)

ed-tech resources:

Discovery ‘Getting to Know: Energy’

OnBoard ‘Energy and Work’, ‘Transferring Energy’, ‘Sounds’

Gizmos ‘Energy Conversions’, ‘Conduction and Convection’

Websites:

Other Arundel Nature and Science Centre (ANSC):

1.a, 2.g, 3 a Can You Survive? Winter Survival Outdoor program at ANSC. Learn about how humans consume energy in a natural setting from fire building and transformation of energy to consuming energy.

Smarter Science energy balls

This kit contains a windmill, hydroelectric generator, and solar power cells as well as energy converting devices such as a light, gears, buzzer and amp meter. Use this kit to show how energy can be converted from one form to another and transferred from one place to another.

SWLSB

Cycle 2

Grade 3

Earth and Space

Matter

muddy waters

Essential Questions:

What are different soils made of?

How does the quality of water, soil or air impact living things?

How does water move through the environment?

WHAT DOES THE STUDENT NEED TO KNOW?(POL)

HOW WILL IT BE TAUGHT?

1. Properties and characteristics of matter on Earth

a. Compares the properties of different types of soil (e.g. composition, capacity to retain water, capacity to retain heat)

b. Describes the various ways in which the quality of water, soil or air affects living things

c. Distinguishes between a fossil (or a trace of a living thing) and a rock

2. Organization of matter

a. Describes the observable properties of crystals (colour, geometric patterns)

3. Transformation of matter

c. Explains the water cycle (evaporation, condensation, precipitation, runoff and infiltration)


ed-tech resources:

Discovery; ‘Natural Phenomena: Rocks Fossils and Earth History’

OnBoard; ‘Evaporation and Condensation’, ‘The Water Cycle’, ‘Fossils’, ‘Soil’

Gizmos ‘Water Cycle’

websites:

Mining Matters : The ‘Deeper and Deeper’ kit is HIGHLY recommended it is available at http://www.pdac.ca/mining-matters/school-programs/teachers/earth-science-resource-kits/curriculum-kits

Arundel Nature and Science Centre (ANSC) :

1a , 1b Field Trip: Soil Survey Walk

Field Trip - Rock Hard Presentation (rocks and geology)

ANSC Geology Hike- In the Field (properties of different soil, look at erosion)

ANSC Google Docs - Where Geology, Ecology and Technology Meet (at ANSC or in class) 1 b Field Trip - What’s in the Water? In the Field - Pasco Spark Units for Water Testing

Videoconferences ‘Rocks and Minerals’, ‘Here Today, Gone Tomorrow’, ‘The Water Cycle’

SWLSB

Cycle 2

Grade 3

Earth and Space

Energy

finding the energy

Essential Questions:

How is it that all energy comes from the Sun?

How can we harness energy from the sun, wind and moving water?

WHAT DOES THE STUDENT NEED TO KNOW?(POL)

HOW WILL IT BE TAUGHT?

1. Sources of energy

a. Explains that the sun is the main source of energy on Earth

b. Identifies natural sources of energy (sun, moving water, wind)

3. Transformation of energy

a. Describes what renewable energy is

b. Explains that sunlight, moving water and wind are renewable sources of energy

c. Describes the methods invented by humans to transform renewable sources of energy into electricity (hydroelectric dam, wind turbine, solar panels)


Engineering is Elementary

Now You're Cooking: Designing Solar Ovens

Lesson 1, Lesson 3, Lesson 4 prioritized

Suggested approach

  • Brainstorm what is meant by energy, once a definition is established, brainstorm where we get our energy from (sources) IMPORTANT make the distinction between energy types and energy sources!
  • Explore the idea of Renewable and non-renewable energy sources and demonstrate that in both cases the ultimate source of the energy is our sun.
  • Use EiE lessons plus demonstrations/practical activities to explore and show energy sources

Inquiry opportunities:

Other experiments/demos: Hydro Quebec: ‘00Watt’ Tool Kit

Order tool kit for class on-line from http://www.clsm.org/index.php/nous-joindre


ed-tech resources:

Discovery; ‘Power up: Energy in Our Environment', A First Look at Electricity

OnBoard; Energy and Work

Gizmos Energy Conversions

Other ‘Let’s talk Energy’: interactive games and videos from energy.techno-science.ca

Smarter Science: UV Beads

Arundel Nature and Science Centre (ANSC):

Photosynthesis: ‘Power of Life’, take a walk through the ANSC forest and see first-hand how the sun is the main source of power which drives all energy.

Websites: https://energy.techno-science.ca/en/whats-on/energy-games.php

This kit contains a windmill, hydroelectric generator, and solar power cells as well as energy converting devices such as a light, gears, buzzer and amp meter. Use this kit to show how energy can be converted from one form to another and transferred from one place to another.

SWLSB

Cycle 2

Grade 3

Living World

Matter

Life as we know it

Essential Question:

what do all living things have in common?

WHAT DOES THE STUDENT NEED TO KNOW?(POL)

HOW WILL IT BE TAUGHT?

1. Characteristics of living things

a. Explains the basic needs of the metabolism of

living things (e.g. nutrition, respiration)

c. Distinguishes among the different types of embryonic

development (viviparous for the majority of mammals,

oviparous or ovoviviparous for the rest)

e. Describes the types of sexual reproduction in plants

(pistil, stamen, pollen, seed and fruit)

2. Organization of living things

b. Describes the characteristics of different kingdoms

(microorganisms, fungi, plants, animals)

c. Classifies life forms according to their kingdom

d. Lists animals according to their classification

(mammals, reptiles, birds, fish, amphibians)

e. Describes the anatomy of plants (roots, stems,

leaves, flowers, fruits, seeds)

f. Associates the parts of a plant with their general

functions (roots, stems, leaves, flowers, fruits,

seeds)

g. Associates the parts and systems of the anatomy

of animals with their general functions

h. Explains the sensorial functions of certain parts of the

anatomy (skin, eyes, mouth, ears, nose)

3. Transformations of living things

b. Describes the growth stages of a flowering plant

c. Describes the growth stages of various animals


Engineering is Elementary

The Best of Bugs: Designing Hand Pollinators

Lesson 1, Lesson 3, Lesson 4 prioritized

Suggested approach

  • Use Socratic questioning with class to develop characteristics/definition of a ‘Living Thing’ with a special focus on the basic needs of all organisms.
  • Introduce the idea of classification and taxonomy and use/create dichotomous keys
  • Explore major taxonomic groups of animals (mammals, reptiles, birds, fish, amphibians)
  • Focus on flowering plants and examines structure and function of parts
  • Dissect flower and use this to introduce plant reproduction and concept of ‘Life Cycle’
  • Compare and contrast animal and plant life cycles

Inquiry opportunities:

Other experiments/demos:


ed-tech resources:

SWLSB

Cycle 2

Grade 3

Living World

Energy

feeding time

Essential Questions:

what nutrients do animals need to survive?

how does energy move through the food chain?

WHAT DOES THE STUDENT NEED TO KNOW?(POL)

HOW WILL IT BE TAUGHT?

1. Sources of energy for living things

b. Explains the nutritional needs common to all

animals (water, sugars, lipids, proteins, vitamins,

minerals)

c. Associates familiar animals with their diet

(carnivorous, herbivorous, omnivorous)

g. Describes agricultural and food technologies (e.g.

cross breeding of plants and their propagation by

cuttings, selection and breeding of animals, food

production, pasteurization)

3. Transformation of energy in living things

a. Illustrates a simple food chain (3 or 4 links)

Engineering is Elementary

N/A

Suggested approach

  • Build on the concept of the ‘needs of living things’ introduced in the ‘Life As We Know It’ module and then focus in on nutrition.
  • Explore different types of nutrients and their roles e.g. protein for growth and repair of tissues.
  • Introduce the notion of energy flowing through an ecosystem through Food Chains
  • Compare and contrast food chains from different environments (e.g. aquatic vs terrestrial)
  • Use food chain role-play to demo the movement of energy (see MQ for details)

Inquiry opportunities: - Why are food chains rarely longer than 4 or 5 organisms?

Other experiments/demos:

  • Students track their nutritional intake for a week.
  • Students plan nutritious meals for one day using the Canada Food Guide.
  • Look at animal jaws/dentition and relate form to function (herbivores vs carnivores)
  • Create food chain mobiles for different forest animals showing 3 to 4 links.
  • Organize a agriculture visit to a working farm


ed-tech resources: