Cycle 3

grade 5

SWLSB

Cycle 3

Grade 5

Material World

Matter

properties & changes

Essential Questions:

what are the properties and characteristics of matter?

what types of changes can happen to matter?

WHAT DOES THE STUDENT NEED TO KNOW?(POL)

HOW WILL IT BE TAUGHT?

1. Properties and characteristics of matter

i. Explains the buoyancy of a substance in another substance, using their respective densities (relative density)

j. Describes various other physical properties of an object, a substance or a material (e.g. elasticity, hardness, solubility)

k. Recognizes the materials of which an object is made

5. Changes in matter

b. Demonstrates that chemical changes (e.g. cooking, combustion, oxidation, acid-base reactions) change the properties of matter

c. Explains how certain household products are made (e.g. soap, paper)

Suggested approach;

  • Provide students with a variety of objects and ask them to sort them into groups, they may choose different criteria for this but eventually they should group them according to the substance the object is made of.
  • Use the starter activity as a basis for drawing a list of characteristic properties of each substance and explore how knowledge of characteristic properties of a substance can be used to help identify objects.
  • Analysis of juxtaposed pairs of substances to make comparison charts e.g. wood vs metal, chalk (insoluble) vs table salt (soluble), hard plastic vs flexible plastic etc.
  • Introduce the idea of density as the ‘thickness of a substance’ and perform float vs sink demo’s for various objects to make comparisons of density
  • Explore the states of matter and relate this to density
  • Introduce the idea of CHANGES being an important part of science and demo compare melting wax with the burning of match to draw out students ideas leading eventually to physical change vs chemical change comparisons (good onboard presentation for this)

Inquiry opportunities: carry out the ‘Polymer Ball - McGill WOW Lab’ then follow the ‘Smarter

  • Science’ methodology to experiment with variables to increase the ‘bounciness’!

Other experiments/demos:


ed-tech resources:

SWLSB

Cycle 3

Grade 5

Material World

Energy

energy on the move

Essential Question:

how can heat energy and electrical energy move?

WHAT DOES THE STUDENT NEED TO KNOW?(POL)

HOW WILL IT BE TAUGHT?

1. Forms of Energy

b. Identifies sources of energy in his/her environment (e.g. moving water, chemical reaction in a battery, sunlight)

2. Transmission of energy

a. Distinguishes between substances that are thermal conductors and those that are thermal insulators

b. Distinguishes between substances that are electrical conductors and those that are electrical insulators

c. Identifies the components of a simple electric circuit (wire, source, light bulb, switch)

d. Describes the functions of the components of a simple electric circuit (conductor, insulator, energy source, light bulb, switch)

f. Describes the behaviour of light rays (reflection, refraction)

3. Transformation of energy

a. Describes situations in which human beings consume

energy (e.g. heating, transportation, food consumption, recreation)

c. Explains the insulating properties of various substances (e.g. polystyrene, mineral wool, straw)

e. Recognizes the transformations of energy from one form to another in various devices (e.g. flashlight: Chemical to light; electric kettle: electrical to heat)

Engineering is Elementary

An Alarming Idea: Designing Alarm Circuits Lesson 1, Lesson 2, Lesson 3, Lesson 4

Note: Now You’re Cooking: Solar Ovens and Lighten Up: Designing Lighting Systems EiE Modules done in Cycle 2 addresses some POL points 2.a.,f., 3.c.

Suggested approach

  • Provide students with a variety of objects and ask them to sort them into groups, they may choose different criteria for this but eventually they should group them according to the substance the object is made of.
  • Use the starter activity as a basis for drawing a list of characteristic properties of each substance and explore how knowledge of characteristic properties of a substance can be used to help identify objects.
  • Analysis of juxtaposed pairs of substances to make comparison charts e.g. wood vs metal, chalk (insoluble) vs table salt (soluble), hard plastic vs flexible plastic etc.
  • Introduce the idea of density as the ‘thickness of a substance’ and perform float vs sink demo’s for various objects to make comparisons of density
  • Explore the states of matter and relate this to density
  • Introduce the idea of CHANGES being an important part of science and demo compare melting wax with the burning of match to draw out students ideas leading eventually to physical change vs chemical change comparisons (good onboard presentation for this)

Inquiry opportunities: carry out the ‘Polymer Ball - McGill WOW Lab’ then follow the ‘Smarter

  • Science’ methodology to experiment with variables to increase the ‘bounciness’!

Other experiments/demos:

ed-tech resources:

borrow me

This kit contains a hand-powered electric generator, alligator clamp wires, lightbulbs and sockets, a battery and battery case. Use this to show how mechanical energy is transformed into electric energy.

SWLSB

Cycle 3

Grade 5

Earth and Space

Matter

rocking out

Essential Questions:

what are rocks and how can they be used?

how does the surface of the earth change?

WHAT DOES THE STUDENT NEED TO KNOW?(POL)

HOW WILL IT BE TAUGHT?

1. Properties and characteristics of matter on Earth

d. Distinguishes between a rock and a mineral

e. Classifies rocks (presence of strata, size of the crystals) and minerals (colour, texture, lustre, hardness) according to their properties

2. Organization of matter

b. Describes the main structures on the Earth’s surface (e.g. continents, oceans, ice caps, mountains, volcanoes)

3. Transformation of matter

d. Describes certain natural phenomena (e.g. erosion, lightning, tornado, hurricane)

e. Describes the impact of certain natural phenomena on the environment or on the well-being of individuals

Suggested approach

  • Use EiE units to explore the main concepts of this module in association with the Mining Matters kit (HIGHLY recommended!) – using both of these resources should cover most of the progression.
  • Brainstorm different examples of features of the earth’s surface (e.g. continents, oceans, ice caps, mountains, volcanoes) and illustrate this with Google Earth.
  • A trip to ANSC is a great way to explore real examples of geology in the field!

Inquiry opportunities:

Other experiments/demos:

  • Mining Matters Teacher Resource Kit (Highly Recommended);
  • Kit contains a variety of lessons, hands-on ready to go materials to go with kits.

ed-tech resources:

Discovery

OnBoard ‘The Changing Earth’, ‘Earth’s Structure’, ‘Landslides’, ‘Rocks and the Rocks Cycle’

Gizmos Mineral Identification

Videoconferences Rocks and Minerals (Boonshoft Museum) ’Big Wind, Big Waves: The Science of Hurricane’

Websites:

Arundel Nature and Science Centre (ANSC):

  • 1.a Field Trip - Rock Hard Presentation (geology rocks and minerals)
  • ANSC Geology Hike- In the Field (properties of different soil, look at erosion)
  • ANSC GoogleDocs - Where Geology, Ecology and Technology Meet (at ANSC or in class)
  • 1 b Field Trip - What’s in the Water? In the Field - Pasco Spark Units for Water Testing

borrow me

This kit contains a variety of Rocks and minerals as well as the tools necessary to identify their characteristic properties such as a ceramic tile for a scratch test, and black light. Use this kit to show students how rocks and minerals are classified according to different properties.

SWLSB

Cycle 3

Grade 5

Earth and Space

Energy

fuelling our future

Essential Question:

what non-renewable energy source do we use and how long will it last?

WHAT DOES THE STUDENT NEED TO KNOW?(POL)

HOW WILL IT BE TAUGHT?

1. Sources of energy

c. Identifies fossil fuel-based energy (e.g. oil, coal, natural gas)

2. Transmission of energy

a. Describes methods for transmitting thermal energy (e.g. radiation, convection, conduction)

3. Transformation of energy

d. Describes what nonrenewable energy is

e. Explains that fossil fuels are nonrenewable sources of energy

f. Names fuels derived from petroleum (e.g. gasoline, propane, butane, fuel oil, natural gas)

Engineering is Elementary

N/A

Suggested approach

  • Explore the idea of non-renewable and renewable fuels
  • Focus on Fossils Fuels – what they are, how they were formed and the problems theycan cause
  • Explore non-renewable forms of energy as an alternative and discuss the various types (solar, hydroelectric etc.)
  • Discuss the idea that Fuels are usually used to provide Heat energy (THERMAL ENERGY) and explore the 3 different ways in which heat can move; CONDUCTION, CONVECTION & RADIATION (the Gizmo simulations can help with this as can the ‘Heat & Movement’ Onboard presentation).
  • N.B. connections can be made with the Solar Oven EiE unit from grade 3 in terms of heat transfer

Inquiry opportunities: Smarter Science UV Beads investigation (can link with solar energy)

Other experiments/demos: The ’00 watt’ kit from Hydro Quebec has some good renewable energy demos


ed-tech resources:

Discovery Power Up: Energy in Our Environment’

OnBoard ‘Heat and Movement’, ‘Heat Transfer and Heating Curves’

Gizmos Conduction and Convection’, ‘Heat Absorption’, ‘Heat Transfer by Conduction’, ‘Radiation

Arundel Nature and Science Centre (ANSC):

2.a Can You Survive? Winter Survival Outdoor program at ANSC. Learn about how humans consume energy in a natural setting from fire building and transformation of energy to consuming energy. Basic First Aid - Learning about thermal energy loss.

This kit contains a windmill, hydroelectric generator, and solar power cells as well as energy converting devices such as a light, gears, buzzer and amp meter. Use this kit to show how energy can be converted from one form to another and transferred from one place to another.

SWLSB

Cycle 3

Grade 5

Living World

Matter

growth and change

Essential Questions:

how do living things develop?

how do species continue to exist?

WHAT DOES THE STUDENT NEED TO KNOW?(POL)

HOW WILL IT BE TAUGHT?

1. Characteristics of living things

b. Describes activities connected to the metabolism of living things (transformation of energy, growth, maintenance of systems and body temperature)

d. Describes the types of sexual reproduction in animals (roles of the male and the female)

f. Describes types of asexual reproduction in plants (e.g. budding, propagation by cuttings, formation of rootstocks and tubers)

1. Organization of living things

i. Describes the anatomy and the function of the main organs of the female and male reproductive systems

3. Transformations of living things

d. Describes the changes in appearance of animals that undergo a metamorphosis (e.g. butterfly, frog)

e. Explains the stages of growth and development in humans

f. Describes the physical changes that take place during puberty

g. Describes the main stages of the evolution of life forms

Suggested approach

  • Explore the ideas that for a species to continue, plants and animals must make new members of the species and introduce the idea of reproduction
  • Explore the difference between sexual and asexual reproduction
  • Look at how plants reproduce asexually (e.g. budding, propagation by cuttings, formation of rootstocks and tubers)
  • Explore how animals (including humans) reproduce by introducing the anatomy and the function of the main organs of the female and male reproductive systems
  • Discuss the physical changes that take place during puberty
  • Look at the idea of Life cycles in both plants and animals

Inquiry opportunities:

Other experiments/demos:

ed-tech resources:

SWLSB

Cycle 3

Grade 6

Living World

Energy

plants

Essential Question:

why do people say that plants are the lungs of our planet?

WHAT DOES THE STUDENT NEED TO KNOW?(POL)

HOW WILL IT BE TAUGHT?

1. Sources of energy for living Things

d. Describes how photosynthesis works

e. Distinguishes between photosynthesis and respiration

f. Explains how water, light, mineral salts and carbon dioxide are essential to plants

g. Describes agricultural and food technologies (e.g. crossbreeding of plants and their propagation by cuttings, selection and breeding of animals, food production, pasteurization)

2. Transmission of energy in living things

b. Describes an ecological pyramid of a given environment

Suggested approach

  • Explore the idea that all things need energy and that this comes to us humans in the food that we eat but that most plants (Venus flytraps etc. aside) do not eat and so they have to make their own food.
  • Discuss the concept of photosynthesis and explore the INPUTS and OUTPUTS then compare it with respiration which is essentially the reverse pf photosynthesis (INPUTS and OUTPUTS reversed).
  • Explore what else plants need to survive and grow apart from the sugar they make in photosynthesis i.e. water and mineral nutrients from the soil.
  • Discuss how mankind has used plants and animals in agriculture

Inquiry opportunities: STIC; ForeST Greenhouse

Other experiments/demos: take plant cuttings (e.g. Spider plant) and grow new plants to see how humans can artificially manipulate plant reproduction. Growing carrot tops is another fun practical for this purpose.

ed-tech resources: